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Review: The Dakota Winters

dakota wintersWhen we were in Ann Arbor a couple weeks ago, we went over to Nicola’s books.  (Literati, we’ll catch you next time.)  One of the things I like to do is go over to the Staff Picks section and see what’s there.  Buying and reading one of those books will tend to keep you out of ruts.

I don’t have a system.  I try to find some literary but not genre-y.  Which led me to The Dakota Winters by Tom Barbash.  The book isn’t about the winter in South Dakota.  It is about a family named Winters who live in The Dakota, and by that I mean THE DAKOTA, as in the place where super-rich people live and John Lennon was killed.

As readers of this blog know, reading about rich people is a guilty pleasure.  In this case, the head of the family is a Johnny Carson-like talk show host who had a nervous breakdown on the air and his family, including the main character, who has come home after catching malaria in the Peace Corps.

The book is set in the late 70’s in New York, so sort of before it got all cleaned up, and we all know what’s happening in the early 80’s at the Dakota.  And, our character gets to know John Lennon, going so far as to teach the great man how to sail.

A lot of the reviews of the book discuss this as a book that is a story of its time and place and I would definitely agree.  I found myself absorbed into the world of the book–much like Gentleman from Moscow.  It takes you to Hollywood, the 1980 Olympics, and, of course, The Dakota.

It is extremely readable.  The characters are strong, you root for them, and the whole thing unfolds elegantly and effortlessly in a way you have to admire.  The book is funny and not overwrought.  There’s emotion, but we’re not overdoing it or turning it into Anne Tyler.

The main thing that bothered me–and this was next to nothing, but not nothing–was some of the Lennon dialogue.  He’d be having discussions with a group of people and he’d say something, sort of out of the side of his mouth, like “just like Paul, on a power trip,” and it was jarring to me.  It happened three or four times, and it took me out of the moment for a second.

It just felt forced and artificial.  It’s entirely possible that you could never write fictional dialogue for John Lennon that would please me–I had a serious John Lennon phase in the 80’s–but I do feel like you could have gotten the same thing done with the story with Lennon never talking about the Beatles.

My feeling on this receded a little bit when I read the acknowledgments and saw the amount of research that Barbash did on Lennon to make the writing realistic.  He truly did his homework.  (In fact, if you should read the book, the sailing trip to Bermuda is real.)  Still, jarring is jarring.

Yoko is mentioned but never appears, FYI.

But that’s like four sentences.  The book is really enjoyable and smart.  There are good riffs (get it?) on stardom, mental health, family, redemption, etc.  And you get a free ride along with celebrities.  It’s a well-earned four stars from me.

Review: American Emperor

american emporerSo, as you might have gathered by now, we’re big Hamilton fans.  We went in November to Chicago to see the show and we’ve both listened to the soundtrack about 950 times.  Can sing all the words.  Etc.

So a co-worker loaned me this book (American Emporer by David O. Stewart) about Aaron Burr, mostly after he shot Alexander Hamilton.  It’s excellent and recommended.  Difficult as it might be to believe, Burr’s life was even more tormented and treacherous after the duel than his life was before shooting Hamilton.

Truly, it’s a Shakespearean Tragedy.  When you get to the end–when his grandson dies and then his beloved daughter dies in a shipwreck on her way to see him for comfort–within days of each other–you’re seeing a life in complete collapse.

We actually heard some of this story when I was in middle school.  We did one of those long-term projects that centered on Blennerhassett Island–a Marietta-area island in the Ohio River that was owned by a rich family (eponymously) and was the location of much of the intrigue.

Stewart captures this perfectly.  It was an idyllic island, beautiful, self-sufficient, wealthy…and then…

Into this Eden slithered Burr.

The Blennerhassetts were no revolutionaries.  They were innocents who were duped by the flattery and persuasion of Aaron Burr–eventually losing everything.  (You can visit the island today, including their mansion.  It is a West Virginia State Park).

Maybe the most interesting thing about the book, though, is that it offers another linkage between books–in this case, The Brothers Karamazov.

So, Burr was put on trial for treason, which history shows us he was 100% guilty.  Much like Dmitry, who was put on trial for a crime for which he was 100% not guilty.

Beyond that, both trials were public spectacles, with huge rooms filled with spectators and more people following the trial in the newspapers.  And in both cases, an all-star team of defense lawyers battled a group of competent but overmatched government bureaucrats.

But the most important difference was that neither trial was actually about what it was supposed to be about.  In Dmitry’s case, he was convicted because there was a dead body and somebody had to be responsible, and he was the only one available to do that.  The arguments were not about whether he did it, but whether his actions afterward were the actions of a man who did it.  Whether it fit with the patterns of before and after.  Or whether there had been a packet of money or not.

But the trial did not turn on whether or not he actually killed his father.

My view is that Dostoyevsky was telling us that the as pure as ideals like justice might be, their translation into human life is naturally flawed.  He made similar observations about the Church.

Burr’s trial was similar.  The actual battle was over a bizarrely bad indictment written by prosecutors, the Framer’s very narrow definition of treason and the fact that Chief Justice John Marshall could not stand his cousin, President Thomas Jefferson.  The drama spun on this, while Burr’s guilt sat in the middle like the eye of a storm.

This is an era of our history that I was less educated on.  In fact, Chernow’s Grant biography combined with this one suggests that we might have been over-taught on the wars and under-taught on the aftermath.  Just one thing to illustrate.  Following the Revolution, there had been a bunch of secession crises in the US, including in New England.  The idea that the West might secede–as Burr dreamed of–looks a little less delusional in the right context.

Beyond all that, this is a great story told well.  To answer the inevitable question, not sure there’s a rap musical in this.  But there is a tragedy–for the stage or film.  Recommended.

One Book, Two Book

So, recently I had one of those interconnected things where I read an article that reminded me of one book I had loved and then it connected me to another book I had read.sweet season

Let’s start with the first book.  It was Sweet Season by Austin Murphy–and it was one of the best sports books I have ever read.  Murphy is the real deal.   He wrote for Sports Illustrated, which in the day was the best sportswriting (and among the best writing) available anywhere.

Murphy was spending his time interviewing prima donna athletes in strip clubs and feeling kind of icky about it.  So, he went and spent the year with his family in Collegeville, MN at St. John’s College.

St. John’s is a DIII school where your professor is probably a monk.  They were coached by John Gagliardi, a legend in college coaching.  Gagliardi had many odd tactics, including never cutting anyone from the team and never blocking or tackling during practice.

Murphy talks to the monks, talks to real student-athletes, follows their season and reflects on his life.  It’s like Season on the Brink except there’s no brink. It’s an excellent book that will make you feel good and teach you something about whatever you do in your life.

So, over Christmas, I was reading something online and I ran across this article by Austin Murphy.

I Used to Write for Sports Illustrated. Now I Deliver Packages for Amazon.

It is the same guy.  After my initial shock, I read the article.  The upshot is that SI downsized, he wasn’t making enough money freelancing.  So, went to Indeed and got a job delivering packages.

He relays how he is ashamed to go to a holiday party and tell people what he is doing.  I think most people can identify.  You think…I could lose my job, and work at Starbucks and have to serve people I formally worked with.  The disgrace!  The embarrassment!  I would be completely miserable.

That’s how we see it.  And yet, that’s not how it felt when it happened.

When I’m in a rhythm, and my system’s working, and I slide open the side door and the parcel I’m looking for practically jumps into my hand, and the delivery takes 35 seconds and I’m on to the next one, I enjoy this gig. I like that it’s challenging, mentally and physically. As with the athletic contests I covered for my old employer, there’s a resolution, every day. I get to the end of my route, or I don’t. I deliver all the packages, or I don’t.

Which connects the second book, Stumbling on Happiness by Dan Gilbert.  The point of stumblinghis book is exactly this.  When we have something good we want, we overestimate how good it will make us feel.  Life has a regression to the mean effect.  Other things come up.  You worry about new things.  Your real happiness in that future state–even when achieved–will never pay off the promise.

The same thing works in reverse for the downsides of life.  We think we would be miserable if we lost our job.  Had a severe injury and became disabled.  We think life would be unlivable.  But Gilbert former Speaker Jim Wright to show that not only are you not miserable but, in the case of Wright, you are happier.  We have a coping mechanism that levels out the decline.  Good things in life still exist and some bad things are gone.

Murphy’s story is exactly that example.

Anyway, that’s one of the great things about reading, when two ships dock in your head.

 

Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn

16201This book was gifted to me. (Thanks Amber!) It was not on my radar, but I am very grateful to Amber for giving it to me.

I loved this book. It was funny, inventive and relevant.

The premise is that a fictional country/island, just off the coast of South Carolina. It is named after Nevin Nollop, the fellow who authored the sentence “the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog” – which contains all the letters of the alphabet. (I know I age myself here, but I spent a lot of time in typing class pecking out this sentence…yes typing on an actual typewriter.) The island council starts banning letters as they fall from the memorial statue of the founder. The book is written via letters between the characters.

(Note: following on BJ’s review of the book, my 9th grade typing teacher was Miss Gilchrist.)

This is a book with many levels. First, it’s quirky and cute – I mean, look at the cover. Second, it’s well written. The characters are well formed and you get to know them and empathize with them through their correspondence.

The other level of this book demonstrates what happens to society when your basic rights are taken away. Language is such an elemental function of our lives and our society and it’s something we take for granted. This illustrates how slowly and stealthily these changes take place. Today you can’t use the letter ‘Z’ and tomorrow you can’t use the letter ‘N’, and then all of a sudden the government is reading your letters and people are being deported because of too many infractions.

In the reviews I read, people criticize this because there are ‘better’ dystopian novels out there. I would agree 100% (I’m looking at you Handmaid’s Tale). However, this is not that. What I appreciate about the author is that he embraces what the book is and runs with it – see earlier comment re: quirky and cute. But there is this undertone of fear and evil to it. That, in my opinion, is what makes this a 5 star book.

The other extremely cool thing about the book is because the book is written in letters between the characters, they have to abide by the new laws and not use the banned letters. This could be a ‘look ma no hands’ ploy to show-off, but it doesn’t come across that way. Kudos to the author for writing the last part of the book using 10 letters (or whatever it ended up being).

What I took from this book, and what I think is 100% relevant today is that innocuous changes and rules can end up with dire consequences. It’s the old ‘frog being boiled’ scenario – if you put it in boiling water, it jumps out, but if you put it in and slowly warm the water, bam!

Overall you can read this on any level you like – it’s a quirky cautionary tale that is more relevant today than it was when it was written in 2001.

 

Review: Ella Minnow Pea

16201So a friend of ours gave Barb a copy of this book, Ella Minnow Pea, which we have both just gotten around to reading.

It’s a really good book.  Here’s the basic idea.  This group of people lives on an island devoted to the man who created the pangram, “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog,” something I used to type every day in TYPING class, when, you know, we took TYPING as a class.

That was the 9th grade.  Teacher was Mrs. Lemmerbrock.

Anyway, the whole island worships this guy and they have a sign up that has the phrase on it, except one day the “z” falls down and the island’s leaders decide to outlaw any use of the letter, which seems minor but is a big deal…it causes the entire library to close, for example.  The penalties are stiff–first, a public reprimand, second time a public flogging or stocking, and third time is permanent banishment.

It is a novel of letters, which makes it fun because you get to see the residents attempt to correspond, first without using a Z and then without other letters as the sign continues to fall apart.

It’s just a clever book.  It can be read on many different levels.  In looking around online, a lot of people have chosen to read it as a dystopian novel about authoritarian societies, which is fine, but this is no Handmaid’s Tale.

I preferred to read it another way:  as hilarious.  It is just very funny, especially as people are down to writing with 14 letters or something.  The characters are good as well and reveal themselves in how they respond to the ridiculous edicts of the leaders of the island.

It is also a writing feat of the first order.  First, of course, all of the letters conform to “the law” as it might stand at any given time.  This is a writing challenge that gets more difficult as it goes along.  Second, there is a plot where the people are trying to come up with shorter pangram than the original one, and he comes up with a bunch, which is also no small feat.

So, if you like language and laughter, I’d recommend the book.  It’s 100% farce and pure hilarity.

BJ’s year in review…

OK, so a reading year in review, following up on Barb’s review.  I actually wasn’t too keen on this topic, but then when I looked back at the books I read, I discovered little nuggets of unexpected pleasure when thinking back on the books of 2018.  Let me recount them.

karamFirst, our big-impossible-reading-project was Brothers Karamazov.  It was the best of the 3 books we have done so far.  It is a compelling book that can be read on so many different levels but still works as a straight story.  Its characters and story are still relevant today.  I honestly think anyone could read this book.

We didn’t blog about going to see Hamilton in November, but that certainly falls onto the literary scale.  Especially since I was one of those nerds that read the Chernow biography about the time that Lin-Manuel Miranda did.  The show was great.  Hard to believe you can exceed expectations that are as high as the ones we took in the door. It was a lifetime memory.  It also links into this year’s reading because grantone of the books I got for Christmas last year was the Chernow biography of US Grant, which was, of course, very good.  Grant is a great character because he is so multi-faceted.  Also, it shed excellent perspective on the Grant Presidency, which usually is labeled as “corrupt” and then skipped over.  Lastly, the book also doubles as an education of the times he lived in.horse

I read two award-winning books.  The first was A Horse Walks Into a Bar, which won the Man Booker.  Books that win that award can be dicey–I’m sure they have high literary quality but they are often allergic to readability.  This book was really good.  It was presented in anless original way and gradually revealed the pain that often is behind humor.  I also read Less, which won the Pulitzer Prize.  It was deserving as well.  A great story and a great character about life in the twilight.

I also read a couple books that probably don’t go down as literary but were fantastic red sparrowreading experiences.  Red Sparrow is a smart spy thriller, along the lines of The Americans.  The challenge is to not make the characters be cliches–you don’t need “The Russian Guy.”  Also, Putin is a character.  The other CAA bookone was Powerhouse by James Andrew Miller.  I’m a big fan of Miller’s oral histories and also a closet Hollywood-people-behaving-badly junkie, and this history of CAA was difficult to put down.

When I look back on the books I read, I see a couple of my rankings that don’t seem to stand the test of time.  One is Ohio, which I gave 5 stars but maybe was a 4 in retrospect.  Or maybe I’m influenced by later ratings from other readers.  And then there was Who is Rich, which I gave 3 stars but remember more fondly now.

I did do a reading challenge.  With the Brothers Karamazov, I tamped down the goal to 12 but I actually read 18.  Goal for this year is 20, plus Ulysses, #4 in the series.

Barb’s Year in Review

booksale-champagneIt’s that time of year when people make lists and look back on the year that was. I’d like to say this will be different, but who am I kidding. As we wind down 2018 here are some of my thoughts on the year that was….in book related terms.

This past year was our first full-year of having this blog. So that’s a thing, right? There is probably another post that I can write about what I’ve learned – good and bad – about the blogging process. It’s been fun to have somewhere to write about books. Also, it’s been a cool thing for us as a couple to have something to talk about – other than football and who is going to clean the bathroom.

It was a big year for me in non-book related things – moving and settling into a new city (well, actually country). I had a lot of downtime after I moved, so I was able to plow through many books. That was a pretty good way to spend some time. As a result I managed to read 52 books without breaking a sweat.

As for the ‘top’ books out of that 52 – here is what I’ve got:

american marriageAn American Marriage by Tayari Jones was a standout for me. It was a great book – both in storytelling and the subject matter being heartbreaking and topical. For me, it was cool to get to review it before it was published, have it be an Oprah’s book pick and be a very popular book (it made former President Obama’s read list).

firesLittle Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng was just a superb book. It was engrossing and so well written. I literally can’t say enough about that one. I am always skeptical about books that get rave reviews but this one stood up to the hype. Also, she is from Ohio – my new home state. So yay Ohio!

16201Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn was a quirky and cool read. I haven’t reviewed it yet (stay tuned) but it was a reading hi-light for me, for sure.

KaramazovAnd then there were the Karamazov Brothers – our 2018 reading project.This was a surprise to both of us that we enjoyed it as much as we did.

Overall, I was, and am grateful that I am able to read and enjoy as many books as I do. And equally grateful that I can share my thoughts and reviews. Here is to a great 2019 filled with love, laughter and books! Cheers!

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