Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn

16201This book was gifted to me. (Thanks Amber!) It was not on my radar, but I am very grateful to Amber for giving it to me.

I loved this book. It was funny, inventive and relevant.

The premise is that a fictional country/island, just off the coast of South Carolina. It is named after Nevin Nollop, the fellow who authored the sentence “the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog” – which contains all the letters of the alphabet. (I know I age myself here, but I spent a lot of time in typing class pecking out this sentence…yes typing on an actual typewriter.) The island council starts banning letters as they fall from the memorial statue of the founder. The book is written via letters between the characters.

(Note: following on BJ’s review of the book, my 9th grade typing teacher was Miss Gilchrist.)

This is a book with many levels. First, it’s quirky and cute – I mean, look at the cover. Second, it’s well written. The characters are well formed and you get to know them and empathize with them through their correspondence.

The other level of this book demonstrates what happens to society when your basic rights are taken away. Language is such an elemental function of our lives and our society and it’s something we take for granted. This illustrates how slowly and stealthily these changes take place. Today you can’t use the letter ‘Z’ and tomorrow you can’t use the letter ‘N’, and then all of a sudden the government is reading your letters and people are being deported because of too many infractions.

In the reviews I read, people criticize this because there are ‘better’ dystopian novels out there. I would agree 100% (I’m looking at you Handmaid’s Tale). However, this is not that. What I appreciate about the author is that he embraces what the book is and runs with it – see earlier comment re: quirky and cute. But there is this undertone of fear and evil to it. That, in my opinion, is what makes this a 5 star book.

The other extremely cool thing about the book is because the book is written in letters between the characters, they have to abide by the new laws and not use the banned letters. This could be a ‘look ma no hands’ ploy to show-off, but it doesn’t come across that way. Kudos to the author for writing the last part of the book using 10 letters (or whatever it ended up being).

What I took from this book, and what I think is 100% relevant today is that innocuous changes and rules can end up with dire consequences. It’s the old ‘frog being boiled’ scenario – if you put it in boiling water, it jumps out, but if you put it in and slowly warm the water, bam!

Overall you can read this on any level you like – it’s a quirky cautionary tale that is more relevant today than it was when it was written in 2001.

 

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