The Brothers Karamazov, Book Ten: A boy and his dog

MV5BMmMwNGY0OGItYzg5MS00OGY5LWJkMTYtZmVhMjczMmJkMmVjXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNzU1NzE3NTg@._V1_CR0,45,480,270_AL_UX477_CR0,0,477,268_AL_So we are moving along in the story. Dimitry was being questioned about the MURDER of his father and then we get to the next book where….wait what? We seem to be taking a step back in the action.

A while back in the book, some kid bit Alyosha’s finger – well he (Ilyusha) and Alyosha are back, along with the kid who got stabbed in the leg with a knife (Kolya). With all the other stuff going on in the book this seems somewhat random. However, it can’t be, right?

I think this section is about a bunch of things, one is forgiveness. Alyosha worked at getting Kolya to visit the sick boy because the two boys had a falling out. It was kind of a Mean Girls situation, but with 1800’s Russian schoolboys. Kolya brings his dog with him that does a bunch of tricks – that delight all of the people assembled, especially Ilyusha (the sick boy). Kolya realizes that he might have been a bit harsh in freezing out the sick boy from his circle of friends. Also, Aloysha basically rallys the kids around the bedside, after they all were pretty mean to him.

The other interesting thing about this section is that the young rascal Kolya has some pretty strong views on politics and the world. He proclaims himself as a “socialist” and has a conversation with his friend, Smurov:

‘There’s nothing funny about it, it’s just you don’t understand it. Nothing in nature’s funny, however it may seem to man, with his prejudices. If dogs could reason and criticize, I’m sure they’d find plenty that would seem funny to them, to say the least, in the social relationships between people, their masters—even more than funny, I should say, because I’m firmly convinced that we’re by far the more foolish. That’s an idea of Rakitin’s, a remarkable idea. I’m a socialist, Smurov.’ ‘What’s a socialist?’ asked Smurov. ‘It’s when everyone’s equal, all goods are owned in common, there’s no marriage, and religion and all the laws are whatever anyone fancies, and so on and so forth. You’re still too young for that, you’re not old enough.

It seems to me that Dostoyevsky is sorta mocking this line of thinking. There is a push-pull in the book between forward progress and ideas and old-school thinking. I think by having a 14 year old boy the the poster child for the progressive view, Dostoyevsky shows that he doesn’t think very highly of it.

As an aside, there was a little line that cracked me up:

Whenever he met another dog, they would indulge in unusually enthusiastic mutual sniffing, in accordance with all the rules of canine social etiquette.

This is totally true, right? It made me chuckle.

On to the next part!

 

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