The Boston Girl by Anita Diamant

22450859I took a trip (practicing highway driving) to the local Books a Million (bookstores here are not as plentiful as they were back in Toronto). This book was on sale and I was like….boom. Or BAM since I was in Books a Million (see what I did there).

I was a huge fan of The Red Tent (Diamant’s first book) so I wanted to check this out. Obviously the time period was different: biblical times vs. 1900’s Boston. However, the subject matter was similar, in a way.

Obviously this book is about a “Boston Girl”. It’s the story of Addie Baum. She is the daughter of Jewish immigrants, and the only one of her siblings to be born in America. The story is told from Addie’s point of view – as she is telling her life story to her granddaughter.

Addie is sassy and smart and funny. I really felt for her and the hardships that she faced throughout her life. This book really struck home to me how much different things were, not that long ago.

I guess this is a coming of age story, but it’s more than that. How does your heritage form your growth and development? How does family do that? I think that the author did a good job of posing those questions.

This book is also about female empowerment. In a lot of ways Addie is a trailblazer: from wanting to have an education, not being obsessed with getting a husband, and wanting to make her own life. This is also about the power of friendships – those people who are close to us proximity-wise, and those friends who aren’t, but are just as close and important to us.

If you are going to read this expecting The Red Tent, you are going to be disappointed. But if you want an interesting and engaging read, and want to meet a sassy and funny lady, then this is for you.

I rated this 4/5 stars on Goodreads.

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